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Twelve weeks broken

This entry was posted on Sunday, October 16th, 2016 by Frances Ryan.
Tags: walking, stubborn, sports, running, lessons, health, broken ankle

Twelve weeks ago, I broke my ankle whilst walking home from the shops. Twelve long, long weeks ago! And twelve is the magic number because that’s the number of weeks I was told it would take to go through the first bits of the healing process. And that means that today is the last day of Phase II: Learning to walk again. It also means that I am allowed to attempt running tomorrow. (Don’t worry, I’ll be careful!)

I had hoped my ankle would be 100% healed and back to normal by this time. But, sadly, I still have a long way to go towards full recovery. (My most-likely final ankle post tomorrow will talk about that.) Although, when I stop to think about how much pain I was in when I first injured myself—and how I was unable to put any weight on my ankle at all for the first four weeks—I suppose I have really healed quite a bit. (But I’m impatient and I’m getting less thin because of the lack of running!)

But, as I said, I am healing. Slowly, but definitely healing. You can read the boring bits about that healing below.

Daily living, balancing life and work:
The last three weeks were spent without the use of the walking boot—which is a special joy to me as the tapering was meant to last between two and six week, and I managed it in three. The biggest reason I was able to do that was that I was housesitting for a couple of weeks and was working remotely during that time. That meant that I was able to walk, rest, and exercise when my ankle needed it, rather than when it fit with my schedule for travelling to and from the office. I do acknowledge, however, that I might have been better off tapering in a different manner. But the Croatia trip and housesitting made that a bit of a challenge. But what’s done is done!

However, living without the boot did make my daily living and chores a bit easier. And by now, there isn’t really much I can’t do. Although I do have to pace myself a bit because my ankle gets quite sore the more I do.

I am finding that I still need to find a bit of balance with everything. I need to remember to elevate my leg a bit more often. And I need to remember that my ankle is still weak and can’t handle a full day’s walking around like it used to. I also have to remember that certain shoes are more (or less) painful than others—especially when worn for more than a couple of hours.

But ultimately, I am managing so much better than I was even two and four weeks ago. So things are getting better!

Pain and swelling:
I think what surprises me most is that there is still a bit of pain. And not just when I’m moving my ankle, but also when I’m just lounging around. It’s this odd, dull pain and I don’t know if it’s a normal part of the healing or not. But if it doesn’t improve over the next couple of weeks, I will give my doctor a call.

The swelling is still there, and it still increases as the day goes on. But it’s less now than it was before so at least I can see that there is improvement. (Even if the improvement is slower than what I would want it to be.)

Up next:
Today is the end of Phase II, so I guess that the “up next” bit is Phase III. And that means trying to run again! I will attempt that tomorrow morning (just a wee 2-minute jaunt on the treadmill) to see how well my ankle holds up. It might be painful, but I won’t know until I run.

I will be monitoring my progress over the next few months to ensure that things are getting better. But to be honest, after three months of dealing with a broken ankle, I’m really just ready to get back to normal—whatever that means.

To read more about my progress, follow the links below:
I am broken
Two weeks broken
Four weeks broken
Six weeks broken
Broken ankle, Phase II: Learning to walk again
Eight weeks broken
Ten weeks broken
Twelve weeks broken
Broken ankle, Phase III: Getting back to normal

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